Reconsolidation Therapy™ in the Press

In recent years, Alain Brunet’s Reconsolidation Therapy™ has enjoyed a wealth of media exposure validating the therapy by highlighting the numerous clinical trials and scientific publications dedicated to the treatment. The therapy has been covered in detail and referred to by both the general and scientific press as a first-line therapy for large-scale traumatic events in the future.

Alain Brunet: A Psychologist Fighting Against Trauma

In the December issue titled “These Heroes Who Change the World”, Alain Brunet was mentioned in the section “Repair the Living”, as one of the the 16 people who is changing the world: “His treatment erases the pain associated with a terrible memory”.

Eric Meÿer

Editor-in-chief, GEO Magazine - Out of series December 2017

Dr. Alain Brunet discusses the use of Reconsolidation Therapy™ for heartbreak on the Savage Lovecast

The psychiatrist who heals the memories after the terrorist attacks

In the early stages of establishing his innovative treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this Quebec psychologist came to France to offer his help after the terrorist attacks of November 13, 2015… Dr. Alain Brunet became one of the leading specialists of PTSD, for which he developed an amazing treatment. The central concept is to combine psychotherapy with the reactivation of a traumatic memory using a beta-blocker. The beta-blocker is a drug that decreases the intensity of emotions associated with a memory. The French media discovered the Brunet Method™ in mid-April when the researcher from McGill University came to Paris to present his project, “Paris MEM.” This study involves testing hundreds of individuals suffering from PTSD, mainly due to the aftermath of the terrorist attacks of November 13, 2015.
For the clinician and humanitarian, it is “an opportunity to get people back on their feet in record time after a large-scale event and to validate the use of Reconsolidation Therapy™ on a large scale.”

Sandrine Cabut

Journalist, Le Monde - 06/06/2016

Following Attacks: the Miracle Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Two 27-year-old friends survived the fatal terrorist attacks on November 13, 2015. They did so by “taking advantage” of that moment when the terrorists reloaded their weapons, and the two friends escaped the Bataclan … Within the next few months, they developed post-traumatic stress disorder. Since then, these two victims are feeling better. “Actually, spectacularly better.” This summer, the two survivors were among the first to participate in an important clinical study put in place by the Paris Hospital Network (AP-HP). About fifty patients – and 400 more to come – are participating in the study and will receive the new treatment. The breakthrough therapy was not created to help patients forget the terrorist attacks, but to alleviate the psychological consequences. “We interfere at the moment when the memory shifts from the short-term memory to long-term memory by reducing its intensity,” explains Dr. Alain Brunet, a trauma specialist at McGill University in Montreal and the co-head of the program. “We want to make sure that the traumatic memory becomes a mere bad memory … a bit like the memory of an ex-boyfriend.” …

“This is the largest study on the subject taking place on an international level. The results will be useful in advancing the treatment for victims of terrorist attacks around the world.”

Florence Méréo

Journalist, Le Parisien - 05/11/2016

A Treatment that Heals the Memory of Victims

Psychologist Alain Brunet has developed a new revolutionary therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder. It was tested on the victims of the Paris and Nice terrorist attacks that took place on November 13, 2015, and July 14, 2016, respectively.

Elodie Lepage

Journalist, L'OBS - 14/09/2017

A Miracle Treatment against PTSD

A Canadian psychiatrist advocates the use of a beta-blocker-based therapy that “blocks certain brain proteins that help an emotional memory materialize.” The highly-publicized clinical trial is currently underway.

Eric Favereau

Journalist, Libération - 18/09/2017

A New PTSD Treatment for Victims of Terrorist Attacks

People suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following the terrorist attacks in Paris last year can benefit from a new therapy developed in Canada.

AFP

THE HUFFINGTON POST - 13/04/2016

What does the Scientific Media say about it?

Alain Brunet’s Reconsolidation Therapy has been the subject of much attention in many health journals. It has piqued their interest due to its importance in terms of public health. This treatment brings hope to patients with PTSD.

Post-traumatic stress disorder: A cure?

Following the tragic terrorist attacks in Paris on November 13, 2015, many people – both directly and indirectly affected – have developed PTSD. Touched by this terrible news, Alain Brunet, the Director of research in psychotraumatology at McGill University (Montreal, Canada) and a specialist in trauma for more than 15 years, offered his support to the Director of the Paris Hospital Network (AP-HP). “Psychiatry is not suited to the management of mass trauma,” he says. His objective is to train staff with his innovative method voluntarily.

The goal is twofold: to train staff and to advance research, with the added possibility of evaluating this method on a larger scale. The doctors involved aim to include 400 patients in their study, with the hope to compare Brunet’s method with other forms of treatment (antidepressants and psychotherapy).

Post-traumatic stress disorder is a memory-related disorder, says Dr. Brunet: “Someone who suffers from it feels like they are in the movie, ‘A Day Without End,’ where a single day is repeated constantly.” Dr. Brunet’s therapy presents an approach that seems to be paying off.

Stéphane Desmichelle

Journalist, Sciences et Avenir - 13/04/2016

An innovative therapy for treating post-traumatic stress

An innovative therapy, combining medication and psychotherapy, has been developed to treat post-traumatic stress.

Following the tragic terrorist attacks in Paris on November 13, 2015, many people – both directly and indirectly affected – have developed PTSD. Touched by this tragic news, Alain Brunet, the Director of research in psychotraumatology at McGill University (Montreal, Canada) and a specialist in trauma for more than 15 years, offered his support to the Director of the AP-HP, Martin Hirsch. “Psychiatry is not suited to the management of mass trauma,” he says. His objective is to voluntarily train staff with the innovative method that he has put in place to take care of patients.

The goal is twofold: to train staff and to advance research (with the added possibility of evaluating the method on a larger scale). The doctors involved aim to include 400 patients in their study, with the hope of comparing Dr. Brunet’s method with other forms of treatment (antidepressants and psychotherapy).

Writing

Allodocteurs.fr - 12/09/2017

Testimonials from patients who have been treated

What do they think about this therapy and what progress have they seen?